Archive for March, 2010

Washington State implements PCI law

The Washington State Capitol. Taken from The J...
Image via Wikipedia

PCI laws are expanding around the country. Washington State is the latest to add a law to their books. Washington state follows Nevada and Minnesota in implementing Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard (PCI), the law is HB 1149. It changes the breach notification law they already had on the books. The key point is that it allows issuing banks a method of collecting the costs to reissue payment cards after a breach.

Organizations who must abide by the law

It defines “business(es)” as merchants processing more than six million cards and sell to Washington state residents.  “Processors” manage account information for others and “vendors” sell software or equipment that processes, transmits or store account information.  Account information can is not so clearly defined. It will be interesting to see how companies outside of the state are affected. PCI Security Assessments are going to become even more prevelant.

How is the law implemented?

Entities that fall under the law are required to provide reasonable security measures. They can be liable for damage and if they have to reimburse their banks for reissuance of card, that can get very expensive.  The law should probably have been more clear on this point

Determining a breach has been defined as “unauthorized acquisition of computerized data that compromises the security, confidentiality, or integrity of personal information maintained by the person or business.”  There is the possibility of confusion between account information and personal information. That will probably cause problems in the future lawsuits. Encryption is also going to be a challenge in the implementation and review for compliance requirements.

How this law integrates or conflicts with PCI requirements will news worthy. The different levels of PCI compliance and the levels identified by the law are now completely consistent. Can PCI SAQ assessment be enforced by the law? Can you be PCI compliant and not compliant with the law, or vice versa? I would venture to say yes.

If only we have a National Standard for all of this. Wouldn’t that be a progressive move?

Gary Bahadur

http://www.kraasecurity.com

http://blog.kraasecurity.com

http://twitter.com/kraasecurity

Address: 200 Se 1st St #601 Miami FL 33131

*Managed Security Services

*Vulnerability Management

*Compliance & Policy Development  

*PGP Security

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]

What are the challenges with protecting electronic documents?

Adobe Systems Incorporated
Image via Wikipedia

We have seen a lot of problems with Adobe vulnerabilities. Adobe has been getting beat up with all the negative publicity in the past few months. Apple is restricting access to Adobe on their devices. Has anyone tried their remote desktop sharing? I wonder if some vulnerability will be release in that application. What is the real problem with electronic document sharing and what are some of the solutions? Adobe is just an example; the whole industry of electronic documents is finally coming into its own. 

Problems with Electronic Douments

How are people accessing electronic documents and how are they signing them and verifying them? Well there are multiple companies out there touting secure signature applications for documents. When do you use these companies?  Some questions to ask include:
1. When and how do you determine the importance of the document?
2. Have you implemented a data classification scheme for electronic documents?
3. Who has the right to sign and read these documents?
4. How do you track usage and distribution?
5. Is there a time frame associated with the life of the document?
6. Can you prevent screen scraping of the secured document?
7. What is the “hackability” of the secure document?

Signing an electronic document can be a challenge for the technology challenged. Some documents might trigger antivirus or malware protection applications. If some intrusion detection applications can read a document or data loss prevention applications do not have access, you could be blocked from that document. Convenience of use is a major hurdle for the adoption of secure documents.

Printing, modifying, viewing, and deleting these documents require all kinds of levels of authorization that is probably difficult to manage. If you can have a location based “bomb” in the document for when it left the organization domain, that would be an interesting play on data loss prevention. We know client side options are easily broken, how do we change the mentality of secure document management?

I do not see how secure documents make too much sense in any public forum. Its not worth the effort to worry about secure documents outside of a strictly controlled corporate environment. Different forms of watermarking have their place in identification but not much in control.

 
The most likely areas are in Research and Development, Legal, Banking and Healthcare. These should be the quickest to adopt a secure framework for electronic documents. Some industry standards need to be followed and a process developed that all companies can follow. This would make it into all the data loss prevention applications eventually and really provide some security.

Gary Bahadur

http://www.kraasecurity.com

http://blog.kraasecurity.com

http://twitter.com/kraasecurity

Address: 200 Se 1st St #601 Miami FL 33131

*Managed Security Services

*Vulnerability Management

*Compliance & Policy Development 

*PGP Security

*FREE Website Security Test 

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]

What is Social Media INSecurity?

Image representing Facebook as depicted in Cru...
Image via CrunchBase

 The trends in Social Media are heading towards more sharing of information. But sharing of information has moved beyond your circle of friends and family. Social media is becoming less social and more… well more corporate. Or more like many people shouting in a bar, you are all in close proximity, but you can’t distinguish the individual conversations, you can’t make out who people really are or who is a potential quality relationship.

How many random friend requests do you get now from Facebook, Friendster, MySpace, LinkedIn, etc. Twitter is a bit different obviously, but that’s a whole other story. Now you are also getting bombarded with corporate Fanpages, groups and other means of luring you to their sites, brands and social following. This is the erosion of your true social circle.Social Media Security is really more about Insecurity. The distribution of your information across multiple platforms used to be in a restricted circle. This can be true data loss.  Now its pretty much everywhere. You can find a person’s LinkedIn profile with a generic Google search. This should be restricted to the LinkedIn environment, but it’s not.With the advent of location based services, we will see physical insecurity based on social media usage. A recently popular site Please Rob Me http://pleaserobme.com has already begun taking advantage of the Twitter location feature. Imagine what can be done by a stalker following someone on twitter or a deranged Ex-boyfriend following you based on the events you are attending on Facebook? It’s easy to see how you can give away all your personal information without event thinking of it. Trends towards making information available will lead to Insecurity. Insecurity will lead to data breaches and compromise. Compromise will lead to lots of crying, money lost, probably lawsuits and other painful results. How do we get past this Social Media Insecurity

Gary Bahadur

http://www.kraasecurity.com

http://blog.kraasecurity.com

http://twitter.com/kraasecurity

Address: 200 Se 1st St #601 Miami FL 33131

*Managed Security Services

*Vulnerability Management

*Compliance & Policy Development 

*PGP Security

*FREE Website Security Test 

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]

Can you protect yourself on Social Media?

Facebook, Inc.
Image via Wikipedia

One of the greatest challenges to privacy and security in the next several years is Social Networks and Social Media. Sites like Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, MySpace and others can be the downfall of valuing information. The ability to share and provide information is completely the opposite of network security requirements.  This is really encouraging people to do things that are not security conscious activities. Social media encourages:

  • Lack of privacy
  • Encouraging information sharing
  • Giving away answers to security questions
  • Social engineering

As we have seen recently, a lot of spam, spyware and malware is attacking social network. Just in the past week I have probably recieved a 100 requests to be my friend on Facebook from people who I do not know and funny enough, all the message have the exact same personal message. Malicious people are attracted to social networks because of the ease of gaining trust and availability of data for social engineering.  Relationship building is easier through social media which can easily lead to phishing attacks.

With these sites, people install applications without knowing what goes on in the background, and its easy to download malicious code to your computer. There are no external third party audits of these applications before the make it to your Facebook application. Your computer can be easily infected by a virus or spyware.

What does the Social Media user to protect their information?
No Personal information – This is anti-social network, but there are things you can limit about what you post. Don’t post your Birthday! Or your address or your mothers middle name or any really personal data.

Limit who can view and contact you – Don’t let your profile be truly public, restrict to people you know for requested users.  Remember you can’t retract information you put out there. 

Don’t trust strangers – Your mother was right, don’t open the door to strangers. Limit who you accept chat or friend requests from and well as even communicate with.

Trust no Profile – People lie, it’s sad but true. So profiles lie, they might say they went to your college or high school.  They might be interested in your groups, so don’t take anyone at their word.

Restrict your privacy – There are some configuration setting in all the social media applications that can allow you to turn on some restrictions on your privacy. Take a minute to actually look at them. One easy example is in Facebook you can create groups that you can place friend in; you don’t want business people seeing what your friends are posting.

Password management – An oldie but a goodie, always use a strong password and don’t share it. And change it periodically.

Layers of protection – You should be running a personal firewall and antivirus software on the machine you are viewing social networks. This will help if a malicious piece of software tries to download something to your machine. Keep your protection software up to date as well and run the patch management software on your machine, this is especially important for you Windows users.

Child protection software – You should have some kind of child protection software running on machines where children under 13 are using. This will help with all that shady software that is out there.

Gary Bahadur

http://www.kraasecurity.com

http://blog.kraasecurity.com

http://twitter.com/kraasecurity

Address: 200 Se 1st St #601 Miami FL 33131

*Managed Security Services

*Vulnerability Management

*Compliance & Policy Development

*PGP Security

*FREE Website Security Test 

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]
online pharmacies +|- cialis price comparison canadian pharmacy viagra ;:." buy cialis soft canadian pharmacy online ]|[ eulexin online pharmacy Medical prescription pharmacy online you can buy medicines. Shipped From the US buy viagra online all items are available online.